Guido Cervone, The Pennsylvania State University

The project goal is to develop better tools to teach how remote sensing and social media can be fused to increase situation awareness during emergencies. A new pedagogical tool will be developed to couple together within a GIS framework, and to provide information on a specific hazard. A plugin will be developed for QGIS that interfaces with the GISolve Middleware developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Nimbus Phantom developed at Argonne National Laboratory.


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Daniel Goldberg, Texas A&M University

To date there has not been a concerted effort by cyberGIS instructors to establish baseline metrics for sharing or evaluating best practices in cyberGIS education aimed at computer science instruction for geography students. The purpose of this project is to begin to address this gap by taking stock of current approaches in cyberGIS education, distilling teaching/learning best practices, assembling model curricula, and developing a conceptual model and theoretical framework for assessing pedagogical approaches and student success in cyberGIS education. To accomplish this, two introductory and commonly taught cyberGIS courses will be used as initial test beds for data collection, collation, and analyses: 1) GIS Programming; and 2) WebGIS. The overarching goal is to leverage existing education literature to develop a conceptual model and theoretical framework for assessing student learning within the very specific context of cyberGIS education in a GIScience undergraduate degree.


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CyberGIS Education from the Bottom Up
Eric Shook, Kent State University

Eric Shook, Kent State University

This project will develop education materials and supporting computational tools that introduce parallel spatial processing to graduate and upper undergraduate students and that can serve as a foundation for numerous cyberGIS-based courses. These education materials will use a novel programming language, parallel cartographic modeling language (pCML), to teach fundamental concepts and principles of cyberGIS. The materials will include eight lessons targeting four topics including slides, in-lab/online activities, and programming assignments, which are designed to teach and apply concepts, principles, and problem solving skills for each topic. Additionally, multiple interactive online mini-modules will be developed and integrated into the lessons to illustrate core concepts. The materials will be released under a creative commons-style license for use and modification.


Related publications:
  • Shook, E., Wang, S., and Tang, W. “A Communication-Aware Framework for Parallel Spatially Explicit Agent-Based Models.” International Journal of Geographical Information Science, DOI:10.1080/13658816.2013.771740

CyberGIS Education Modules for Integration with Existing Undergraduate Curricula
Mark McKenney, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville

Mark McKenney, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville

This project will develop flexible education modules that cover key foundational concepts of cyberGIS; these modules can be used together as an extended module in a single course, or broken into smaller stand-alone modules that compliment concepts in traditional computing courses. The result is that the modules may be integrated into existing curricula in an effort to expose students to cyberGIS fundamentals, or used together as an intensive foundation for cyberGIS. The modules will use free and open-source software, freely available data, and can be run on standard desktop computers, allowing the use of the modules in a wide range of settings.


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CyberGIS: A Multi-Level Pedagogical Approach
Britta Ricker and Jim Thatcher, University of Washington-Tacoma

Britta Ricker and Jim Thatcher, University of Washington-Tacoma

The recent explosion in ownership and use of mobile technology has created vast new opportunities in the creation, collection, and analysis of digital spatial information. Along with the rise in the amount of spatial information has come growing interest in GIS, geodesign, and geovisualization from diverse segments of the population. This interest in spatial information presents a unique opportunity to disseminate the cutting-edge tools and techniques of cyberGIS to a range of public and private interest groups. This project will develop curriculum for four course modules, which will form the basis of University of Washington-Tacoma's new master's program in Geospatial Technology and for classes at Harvard's School of Public Health and the Criminology Department at Simon Fraser University. The proposed system—identifying different levels of need and creating appropriate curriculum therein—brings cyberGIS not only into traditional GIS but multidisciplinary settings where it is most needed.


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Developing CyberGIS Education Curriculum
Qunying Huang, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Qunying Huang, University of Wisconsin-Madison

This project will develop phase-by-phase curricula for cyberGIS education. Students will learn all the techniques and topics related to cyberGIS through two courses: Techniques in CyberGIS and Advanced CyberGIS. Techniques in CyberGIS is an ice-breaking course into cyberGIS and serves as the foundation for the advanced course. This course will help students gain an understanding of the basic concepts of cyberGIS and programming cyberGIS applications, including integrating different types of spatial information into web-based GIS maps. Advanced CyberGIS will expose students to the cyberGIS frontiers, such as high-performance computing (e.g., cluster computing, grid computing, and cloud computing) for big spatial data and GIScience applications, semantic web, and mobile GIS development. A variety of materials will be developed, including a list of cyberGIS topics for the two courses, textbooks, reading lists and labs that can be used for each course.


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Developing CyberGIS Pedagogy for Urban Planning Practice and Research
Bev Wilson and Md. Shakil Bin Kashem, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Bev Wilson and Md. Shakil Bin Kashem, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

CyberGIS has yet to be extensively adopted by planning practitioners and researchers. The inadequacy of education materials on urban planning applications of cyberGIS and a lack of planning professionals trained in cyberGIS are two of the main contributors to this disconnect. This project will begin to fill this gap by developing cyberGIS education materials to augment existing GIS curricula of the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Two GIS courses are currently offered—UP 418: GIS for Planners and UP 519: Advanced Applications of GIS. The first course is intended for planning practitioners and introduces basic concepts and techniques of GIS widely used in urban planning practice. UP 519 is primarily focused on advanced applications of GIS for research and policy analysis in urban planning. Currently both courses are using standalone GIS software (ArcGIS, GeoDa, and R) without the tools and support to expose students to cutting-edge cyberGIS capabilities. This project will develop new lecture and lab materials for both courses. The developed education materials will be shared with the wider community of urban planning practice and research with the expectation that this will encourage further adoption of cyberGIS capabilities by planning practitioners and researchers in the United States and beyond.


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Developing Material for the Course 'Mapping and Analysis in the Cloud'
Terry A. Slocum and Xingong Li, University of Kansas

Terry A. Slocum and Xingong Li, University of Kansas

Slocum and Li will team-teach a new course, "Mapping and Analysis in the Cloud." Available to both undergraduate and graduate students, the course will cover a broad range of approaches for visualizing and analyzing spatial data via the web and associated cloud computing. The fundamental goal will be to enable students to develop their own web mapping and analysis applications. An important element of this will be the creation of map and analysis mashups, in which students use tools and data from multiple online sources to create web mapping and analysis applications. The instructors will create a website that will include all material developed in association with the course, including links to online resources used, material used in lectures and class discussions, and examples of student assignments and independent projects (including all source code and documentation).


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Jie Tian, Clark University

The computational bottleneck in performing large-scale geospatial analyses with conventional GIS has created an urgent need for GIS users and GI scientists to learn about what cyberGIS could offer. The course intends to cover three major domains of competence: (1) fundamentals of cyberGIS, (2) cyberGIS platform and software, and (3) high-performance geospatial computing. Three course modules will be developed; each will be designed to be self-contained and easily incorporable into teaching already popular GIS courses as needed. The idea is to strategically fit the most important cyberGIS topics into the current GIS curricula in a relatively flexible yet pedagogically sound manner. Detailed lecture notes and lab instructions will be developed in synergy to create an effective learning experience for students. Some of the real computation problems encountered by geospatial researchers at my institution (e.g., massive production of vegetation index maps from global satellite imagery) will be included as lab exercises to link teaching with research activities. The developed course materials will be put on the open source learning platform Moodle for easy sharing with other educators of the same teaching interest.


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Dissemination and Evaluation of CyberGIS Education Materials
Karen K. Kemp, University of Southern California

Karen K. Kemp, University of Southern California

Kemp will serve as a curriculum design consultant and mentor on the development of effective learning materials, working with CyberGIS leadership and other fellows to help them develop, design, focus, and coordinate a curriculum and supporting materials.


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Improving Web GIS to Enhance CyberGIS Education at UConn
Chuanrong Zhang, University of Connecticut

Chuanrong Zhang, University of Connecticut

This project will improve an existing graduate level Web GIS course by incorporating new cyberGIS education materials, specifically: Contents related to the concepts and theory behind cyberGIS; New cyberGIS technologies—such as distributed GIServices, Geospatial Semantic Web, and Cloud Computing; New lectures and lab modules to teach students the cyberGIS capabilities and services provided by CyberGIS Center for Advanced Digital and Spatial Studies.


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Introduction to Service-Oriented CyberGIScience
Wenwen Li, Arizona State University

Wenwen Li, Arizona State University

This project will develop new education materials that emphasize the service-orientation aspect of cyberGIScience. Service-orientation has become increasingly important in the architecture design of cyberGIS application systems because spatial data access and analysis need to be transformed from the conventional single-desktop environment to a web-based, service-oriented, cloud-computing platform to overcome major performance bottleneck. This new course, entitled "Introduction to Service-Oriented cyberGIScience," consists of three parts. The first introduces the concepts and principles of cyberGIS. The second introduces the advanced methodology and techniques that support the development of a cyberGIS product. The third part is to tour students with real-world cyberGIS applications to broaden their horizon. Two essential abilities for future GIS students including spatial thinking and computational thinking will be trained in an integrated manner through a combined lecture and hands-on sessions. This new course will be offered as an upper-level undergraduate course at ASU.


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Yi Qiang and Nina Lam, Louisiana State University

As one of the most vulnerable coastal systems in the United States, the Lower Mississippi River Basin in Louisiana is subject to multiple threats, such as hurricane, flood, land subsidence and sea level rise. To better alleviate these threats and enhance the sustainability of the region, a coupled human and natural (CNH) system model is needed to capture the dynamic linkages between the human and natural dimensions. However, conventional computer systems have encountered significant challenges when handle CNH models with large scale, high resolution and multiple components. To overcome these issues, this project will apply cyberGIS techniques to facilitate the CNH modeling research for coastal sustainability at Louisiana State University. This project will use the high-performance, loosely coupled and scalable software components empowered by cyberGIS to model and simulate the dynamics of the CNH system at fine resolution for a large study area. The research aims to identify the key processes and factors that can promote resilience and sustainability. The simulation results can provide useful information for the planning, mitigation and management activities in the study region. Meanwhile, methods and techniques developed through the application of cyberGIS for the research area will be integrated into teaching materials for the classes at LSU. The materials will be designed for a semester-long course on cyberGIS as well as single class topics that can be embedded in other relevant courses. Seminars and workshops will be organized at LSU and local conferences to introduce the concept and applications of cyberGIS to a broader range of potential users.


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